Beach Culture

Some of the South Bay’s favorite traditions have inspired everything
from books to popular movies and music. Check out these highlights.

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Greg Noll: The Art of the Surfboard, by Drew Kampion, (Gibbs, Smith ‘07)

Noll, the Manhattan Beach bad boy and big wave pioneer, penned this insightful and highly readable history of surfboard technology. He traces the design/material/technology innovations from his mentors Dale Velzy and Hap Jacobs up to today’s board shapers and designers. The tale of the signature model Noll marketed for the brilliant but infuriating Miki Dora is worth the price of this profusely illustrated coffee table tome.

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Rare Surf: The South Bay Bands Volume 1
and 2 (AVI ’95)
Lost Legends of Surf Guitar I-IV
(Sundazed ’03)

The Beach Boys aside, early ‘60s South Bay surf music nurtured the Bobby Fuller Four, jazz guitarist Larry Carlton, entrepreneur Richard Delvey, and the Turtles. These compilations lovingly document the Journeymen, Belairs, Eddie and the Showmen, the Nocturnes and the Revelairs, when they played for dancers at the Belair Club, Hermosa Biltmore and Alondra Park.

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The Films of Quentin Tarantino

Tarantino’s idiosyncratic movies are full of nods to movie history, sardonic humor and layered dialogue. Instead of film school, Tarantino devoured cinema history when he clerked in a Manhattan Beach video rental store; it’s the sport of viewers to identify SoCal locations in his scenes.  Del Amo Mall, the Hawthorne Grill (13763 Hawthorne Blvd.) and Cockatoo Inn (Imperial & Hawthorne) are frozen in film via Pulp Fiction (’92) and Jackie Brown (’97).

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People

Edible Education

Getting to the root of kid-friendly gardens in the South Bay

Travel

New York Peace of Mind

Our copy editor seeks spiritual refuge in an unlikely destination.

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