Big Fish

A young entrepreneur pilots a beach-centric fashion brand with philanthropic ambitions.

 

Youth is wasted on the young, right? You may not think so after sitting with Fish at Sea’s 21-year-old founder, Easton Jones. As a surfer, entrepreneur, philanthropist, model and student, Easton is making the most of the energy, passion and optimism often associated with youth and merging those traits with a heavy dose of his own talent and drive.

Established in 2013, Fish at Sea is a lifestyle brand inspired by the South Bay community Easton calls home and the surf he loves. “I wanted to design a beach lifestyle brand for people who love the ocean, because I love the ocean,” he explains.

Combining his collective interest in surf culture, photography, cinematography, style, advertising and marketing, Easton has managed to pair his professional aspirations with his own defining characteristics. “I want to be part of something I’m passionate about, while doing what I love to do,” he says.

For Easton, a big part of what he loves—namely surfing—comes with a deep respect for the oceans and beaches he enjoys … an awareness and consideration that has extended into a desire to give back on a larger scale. Partnering with Water Wells for Africa (WWFA)—a nonprofit with SoCal origins founded by family friend Kurt Dahlin—Fish at Sea donates 10% of its proceeds to the organization.

Since its start in 1996, WWFA has “installed and maintained over 160 wells,” Easton explains. “They help provide clean and sustainable water for over 300,000 people every day.”

While working on the expansion of his own brand, Easton continues to spend as much time as he can in the water, surfing for Globe, SOVRN Republic, Surf Concepts and Wellen (where he also interns in Downtown LA). Of course he also is part of the Fish at Sea team made of South Bay locals Noah Collins, Noah Hale, Ryan Boyd, Ryan Goeglein, Zac Jones, Natalie Anzivino, Hunter Jones and Kris Hall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

SoCal water breaks aside, Easton has surfed the North Shore of Hawaii with his cousin and legendary photographer Jim Russi; Puerto Escondido, also known as the Mexican Pipeline; Costa Rica; and up and down the West Coast from San Fran to Baja. Since catching his first wave at 10 years old, Easton continues to obtain a large part of his inspiration and encouragement from his family, who have “always been supportive,” Easton says.

His father, Rob Jones, specifically was a huge influence on his son’s interest in the water. “He grew up surfing and skating on the Westside during the Dogtown and Z-Boys era,” Easton explains.

Additionally Rob, as the local landscape designer of Jones Landscapes, has inspired his son professionally. “I come from a family of entrepreneurs. I have seen the benefits of owning a business, and it has always been my dream,” says Easton—a dream that he is grabbing onto with both hands.

As the designer of the Fish at Sea website, graphics and logo, the videographer, photographer, and marketing and sales manager, Easton plays an integral role in the life of the brand. And he’s doing so while preparing for the fall semester at Cal State Dominguez, where he plans to obtain his bachelor’s degree.

In the meantime, Fish at Sea continues to grow with goods available online at fishatsea.com, ET Surf in Hermosa Beach, Vanguard Surf & Skate in Torrance and Surf Concepts in Manhattan Beach.

Of course he attributes a large portion of his success to his environment, loved ones and faith. “I couldn’t do it without the community of my closest friends and family who support me, give me advice and help spread the name,” he says, adding, “I wouldn’t be where I am today without my faith in God.”

Easton seems perfectly natural in his many roles, similar to the organic way he explains the origin of his company’s name: “If you’re a fish at sea, you never want to be away from the ocean. I love what I’m doing.”

When you’re passionate about what you’re doing, what’s not to love?

 

 

 

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